Is caffeine bad for you?

If you’re not pregnant or been told by your doctor not to have caffeine, moderate intake should be okay. Aim for no more than 250 mg a day, which equates to about two eight-ounce cups of coffee.

What vegetables do you recommend?

I call veggies (and fruit) health. They are packed full of vitamins, minerals and fiber and they’re low in calories to boot! I recommend eating a variety of vegetables of all different colors. Non-starchy veggies (everything but the starchy veggies: peas, beans, corn, potatoes, winter squash, parsnips and pumpkin) should take up half your plate. Starchy veggies go on one-quarter of your plate. Make sure you prepare your veggies in a healthy...

Lisa’s Take (January 2016)

Calorie and Quality…They Both Matter I recently spoke with someone who said that with regard to weight gain, it doesn’t matter where the calories come from. She suggested that eating a donut is no different than consuming a more nutritious food with the same calorie count. Her argument was it doesn’t matter what food they come from, “calories-in-versus-calories-out” is all that matters. From a pure weight-gain, -loss or -maintenance perspective she’s right. If we take in more calories needed and we don’t burn the excess off, we’ll gain weight. So it’s certainly important that we don’t overeat anything. Too much of even nutritious foods isn’t good. Portion control matters. But my partner in conversation’s position that calories can come from whatever foods we want doesn’t pass muster. She believes if we want to only eat donuts, that’s okay as long as we don’t eat so many that we gain weight. I don’t agree. Where’s the nutrition in a donut or a similar type food? It’s really not there. For example, the saturated fat in donuts isn’t heart-friendly and the high-carb content isn’t good for those with diabetes. And vitamins, minerals, fiber and more aren’t abundant in items like this. And that’s not good because we benefit from them. They can contribute to good health. And where’s the balance of all the food groups? These make up a healthy plate. And let’s face it, donuts are higher in calories than fresh fruit, veggies and other nutritious fare. This can affect our weight. Carrying too much weight on our frames can put us at risk for heart disease, diabetes, hypertension, high...

The Huffington Post lauds STOP THE DIET, I WANT TO GET OFF!

From The Huffington Post January 6, 2015 6 Books to Keep Your New Year’s Resolutions On-Track By Joe Sutton for IndieReader For many of us, the start of a new year inspires us to better ourselves. We set (sometimes unobtainable) goals for the months ahead, hoping to improve and take control of our lives. Unfortunately, sticking to those goals can be difficult after the first few weeks, and by March, the majority of us have gone to back to our old (sloth) ways. If you have a resolution for this year — or if you could use an idea for making one — check out the books below to steer you in the right direction and help keep on track. Stop the Diet, I Want to Get Off! by Lisa Tillinger Johansen If you want to lose weight this year, let dietitian Lisa Johansen help. Her book is a no-nonsense guide to healthy eating, which means you can worry less about keeping up on the latest fad diets and instead focus on the tried and true method of maintaining health: eating a good, balanced diet. Johansen keeps a lighthearted tone throughout the book to make the whole process fun, so you won’t feel as though you’re suffering through a strict program. Wife for Life by Ramona Zabriskie You already know that maybe half of all marriages end in divorce these days. Marriage isn’t easy, so if you find that your relationship is rocky or volatile, you might be desperate to get back on good footing with your partner this year. Ramona Zabriskie’s guide to a good marriage focuses on...