Best Way To Lower BMI?

I am trying to figure out the best way to lose body fat. I work out twice a day doing both cardio and strength training exercises. I would like to say that I am rather healthy when it comes to my diet, no soda, no fast food and rarely any junk food, but I can’t seem to get my BMI down at all. What am I doing wrong? Do you have any suggestions of what I should try? I know that it can be frustrating when we feel we’re doing everything we can to lose weight, but just can’t seem to get anywhere. I have a few questions though. Are you at an unhealthy weight? Is your BMI between 18.5 and 24.9? If so, you’re at a healthy weight and losing pounds wouldn’t be recommended. Another question would be are you getting adequate calories? It’s important that we get enough calories. Restricting them can cause us to hold onto our excess pounds. We all will require different calorie levels, as these are based on height, weight and physical activity. But in general, if you are a female 5’4″ or less in height, aim for about 1200 calories per day. A female over 5’5″ in height should consume about 1500 calories per day. Males 5’10” or less in height should in general aim for about 1800 calories per day. A male 5’11” or more, again in general, should consume about 2000 calories daily. Please see your healthcare provider or dietitian for a calorie level specific to your needs. I don’t recommend anyone going below 1200 calories per day without medical...

Speciaized Diets for Special Conditions?

What would you suggest for me to eat? I have low potassium, soy allergies and am prediabetic and taking medication. Melons upset my stomach and I’m not real crazy about most fruits. I would recommend avoiding those foods that cause you stomach upset and to which you are allergic. With regard to a prediabetic diet, I suggest that you eat 3 balanced meals per day, spread out about 4 to 5 hours apart. Use the healthy plate method in which half the plate is non-starchy veggies, one-quarter of the plate is protein and one-quarter of the plate is starch. You can include low fat/nonfat dairy and any fruit that you do like at these meals as well. Limit/avoid concentrated sweets and don’t drink sugary beverages like regular soda and juice. Lose weight if you are overweight and engage in at least 30 minutes of exercise most days of the week. Since you don’t like many fruits, you can get potassium from other food sources. Many vegetables are good sources of potassium. These include broccoli, Brussels sprouts, Chinese cabbage, artichokes, acorn squash, greens (but not kale), lentils, legumes, okra, potatoes, tomatoes and more. Milk has potassium, as do bran products. For a complete list of food that are high in potassium, check out the National Kidney Foundation web site at...

Ah, Mississippi…

Mississippi, which holds the dubious distinction of being the most obese state in America, recently “weighed” in on New York City Mayor Bloomberg’s so far unsuccessful attempt to limit the size of sugar-laden beverages. What did they do? They passed a bill that would not allow for: (a) the ban of large-sized high-calorie drinks, (b) restrictions on selling toys with kid’s meals that don’t meet certain nutrition requirements (as done in California) and (c) any requirement for restaurants to post calories or pare back portion sizes of menu offerings. Ah, Mississippi. For those who follow my blog, you know that I don’t agree with banning certain food items like 16 ounce and larger regular sodas and other sugary beverages. To me this is a Band-Aid that won’t do much to solve the obesity epidemic in this country. We get too many calories from so many items other than our drinks, so what would limiting one food item actually accomplish? The other problem with the proposed ban in New York City was that it didn’t apply to all food establishments, only those overseen by the health department. It certainly also doesn’t extend to how we prepare, pour and drink our beverages at home. So, okay Mississippi, I see your point there. I also understand the kid’s toy situation. After all, in the state of California where such a ban on toy’s with less than nutritious kid’s meals (Happy Meals, for example) was easily bypassed and didn’t make one bit of difference. As far as limiting portion sizes, it would be nice to see smaller portions, but I believe that educating...

How does one lose the “retired guy” beer gut?

Can anything be done about the “retired guy” beer gut? I don’t even drink! Honest! This isn’t for me! As we age we tend to lose muscle mass and gain fat. Because of this we need to take a hard look at our eating and exercise habits. Are we eating too many calories? Are we getting enough daily physical exercise? Here are some tips you might want to consider: • I recommend that you eat three balanced meals per day. Don’t skip meals. • Follow the healthy plate method in which one-half of the plate is non-starchy vegetables prepared in a healthy manner, one-quarter of the plate is starch and the other quarter is protein. Include low fat/nonfat dairy and fruit as well. • It’s important to monitor portion size. Please read nutrition facts labels for serving sizes. Examples of serving sizes include 1/3 cup of pasta or rice, ½ cup of beans, ½ cup of oatmeal, ½ a medium to large banana, one piece of a small to medium whole fruit, 2 to 3 ounces of meat, fish or poultry for lunch and dinner, and one ounce for breakfast and one cup of milk (nonfat or 1% the best choice) or 6 ounces of fruited yogurt (again low fat or nonfat) or 8 ounces of plain low fat/nonfat yogurt. • Limit/avoid concentrated sweets like candy, cake, pie and more. • Don’t drink your calories. Avoid juice, regular soda and other high calorie/high sugar beverages. • Get adequate calories. In general, for a male who is 5’10” or taller, 1800 calories is adequate. For a male equal to or...

Are there diets that can help Asperger’s patients?

The doctors think my daughter has Asperger’s syndrome. I read something about how cutting out certain foods can make a huge difference. Do you have information on that type of diet? Part of the autistic spectrum disorders, Asperger’s syndrome can affect how a person socializes and communicates with others. Children with Asperger’s syndrome often display social awkwardness and can become completely absorbed in certain topics. Many parents look for dietary answers to help with this condition, such as a gluten-free (no wheat, barley or rye) or casein-free (primarily in milk and dairy products) diets. There is no conclusive evidence that these elimination diets work for Asperger’s syndrome. I would caution using them without the advice and guidance of your daughter’s doctor and dietitian, as it’s important that she get all of the nutrients her body needs. Some people have used supplements such as Omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin B-6 and magnesium, vitamin C, in combination with other vitamins and Carnosine. Some try Melatonin to help their children sleep better, but this can cause side effects. There may be some supportive evidence for these, but again, I would speak with your daughter’s doctor before giving her any over-the-counter supplements. For more information and support please ask your healthcare team about local support groups in your area. I also suggest you check out the Online Asperger Syndrome and Support Web site (OASIS) at http://www.aspergersyndrome.org/ Source:...